The habitat of the Puerto Rican Crested Toad is wetland ponds, pools, ditches, forests and rocky areas. At one period of time it was believed to be extinct until it was rediscovered in 1966. The range of the Puerto Rican Crested Toad is the north and south coasts of Puerto Rico and British Virgin Islands. In 2013, the group released 71,000 tadpoles and 520 toadlets across three locations. Note: Photos and resources on this site may be historical in nature and are intended for educational purposes only.Some of the items included in this list are historical, and may not currently be found at Cleveland Metroparks Zoo. The Puerto Rican crested toad, known locally as "sapo concho puertorriqueño," is the only native toad of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. This agreement created a management strategy to help fulfill the goals of the crested toad's recovery plan and promote partnerships with stakeholders to maximize recovery efforts.

Puerto Rican crested toads are named for the distinct bony crests on their heads. It takes about 18 days for the eggs to mature into toadlets in the wild. Email Amy Gotliffe to donate to Oakland Zoo and Puerto Rican Crested Toad conservation.



Males show more yellow than females on their back. The Puerto Rican crested toad, known locally as "sapo concho puertorriqueño," is the only native toad of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Terms of Use    Adults are brown to yellow-brown in color with black or brown patches and their ventral surfaces are creamy white with some dark mottling. In 2013, the U.S. Even though reproduction is sporadic it occurs throughout the year. Females are larger than males, and more robust. Female Puerto Rican crested toads are typically a dull brown color, though some have pinkish-colored sides. Historically, the toad was found along the northern and southern karst belt in Puerto Rico and on the Island of Virgin Gorda in British Virgin Islands.

Prospects for the crested toad have improved with these conservation efforts. The species was found again within the Guánica Commonwealth Forest in 1984. The Puerto Rican crested toad is medium sized, ranging from 64mm to 120mm snout-vent length and is easily recognized by its turned-up snout and bony head crest.
[1], The U.S. Help    Females are larger than males, and more robust.

Never release non-native animals into local habitats. Both sexes have marbled, golden eyes and textured, pebbled skin, but the female’s are much rougher.
This is the only toad native to Puerto Rico, and once ranged over the entire lowland portion of the island. Location: The RainForest Amphibian Exhibits. Earthworms, beetle and wax moth larvae, crickets, Home    [5][6], Data related to Peltophryne lemur at Wikispecies Another threat is the marine toad, which was brought from South America in the 1920's to control sugar cane grubs. Other cooperative projects have included removing predators from breeding ponds and adjacent habitat, evaluating new reintroduction sites, designing and constructing rearing and breeding ponds, and releasing of captive-bred tadpoles. Not only is the toad returning to areas where it had once disappeared, but biologists have also recently discovered two natural populations in the southern karst of Puerto Rico. The Puerto Rican crested toad (Peltophryne lemur), or simply Puerto Rican toad, is a species of toad found only in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. To help ensure this momentum is carried forward, the Service, the Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources, and the American Association of Zoos and Aquariums signed a Memorandum of Understanding in November 2013. Carlos Pacheco, a fish and biologist in the Service's Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office, can be reached at carlos_pacheco@fws.gov or 787-851-7297.

The males tend to be olive green and gold, though some have yellow-colored sides. Environmental Conservation Online System (ECOS), Information, Planning and Conservation System (IPaC), Candidate Conservation Agreements with Assurances, Recovery Online Activity Reporting System (ROAR), Endangered Species Program's Regulations and Policies. Privacy Policy   

Fish and Wildlife Service, the Department of Natural and Environmental Resources, and the American Association of Zoos and Aquariums have worked together to create a captive breeding program run by the American Association of Zoos and Aquariums. Media related to Bufo lemur at Wikimedia Commons, 10.2305/IUCN.UK.2010-2.RLTS.T54345A11127094.en, "Recovery of the Puerto Rican Crested Toad", "Primer sapo concho puertorriqueño nacido a través de fertilización in vitro", https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Puerto_Rican_crested_toad&oldid=937725946, IUCN Red List critically endangered species, Amphibians of the United States Virgin Islands, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 26 January 2020, at 22:17. The federally threatened Puerto Rican crested toad (Peltophryne lemur) has experienced a dramatic reversal of fortunes, thanks in part to a captive breeding and release program. [2] It is the only species of toad native to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Metamorphosis can occur as soon as 14 days. Coloration is brown marbled with a yellowish-tan or white color, and darker raised lumps along the back and legs.

Login. For two decades, the Service, the Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources, the American Association of Zoos and Aquariums, local organizations, universities, community groups, and volunteers have worked together to search for wild toad populations, improve the quality of habitat and breeding ponds, and encourage the conservation and enhancement of the toad's habitat on privately owned lands. Physical Description. Puerto Rican Crested Toads are a nocturnal terrestrial species that live in excavated burrows and semi-arid rocky areas in evergreen forests. The species formerly occurred in Virgin Gorda and along the southern and northern karst in Puerto Rico. The species formerly occurred in Virgin Gorda and along the southern and northern karst in Puerto Rico. The captive crested toad population has increased from 300 toads to over 600 toads across 31 participating zoological institutions in the U.S. and Canada, and more than 260,000 tadpoles have been released into Puerto Rico's wild over the past 20 years. The IUCN has the species listed as critically endangered.

It is the only species of toad native to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Contact Us    Puerto Rican Crested Toads use seasonal ponds during the rainy season to reproduce, and return to the rocky limestone areas after laying their eggs in long black strings. Toad, Puerto Rican Crested - IUCN Conservation Status. Males show more yellow than females on their back. [3] It is listed as a threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service due to habitat loss and introduced species.

But habitat loss brought on by an increasing human population is severely reducing its numbers. At one time, the toad was believed to be extinct in Puerto Rico until it was rediscovered in the municipality of Isabela in 1966. The Puerto Rican Crested toad is a small toad (2-4 inches long), with the female being the larger of the two sexes. The Puerto Rican Crested toad is a small toad (2-4 inches long), with the female being the larger of the two sexes. The snout is turned up.

Historically, the toad was found along the northern and southern karst belt in Puerto Rico and on the Island of Virgin Gorda in British Virgin Islands. The Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources manages lands under its jurisdiction to help ensure the survival of these released toads.

They have horny ridges on their head and their toes are webbed. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), in partnership with the Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources and the American Association of Zoos and Aquariums, released more than 71,000 tadpoles and 520 toadlets of the rare toad at three sites across Puerto Rico's northern and southern karst—a record-breaking number of tadpoles released within a single year. Oakland Zoo selected the Puerto Rican Crested Toad program as a 2016-2017 featured project, which raised funds to benefit our on-site conservation efforts on behalf of this species. The American Association of Zoos and Aquariums manages the captive breeding program, which has grown significantly since it first started.

The group has released 260,000 tadpoles over the last twenty years. They are medium-sized toads, from 64 to 120 mm long from snout to vent; females are larger than males.